"Instagram hikers" have been warned against traveling into the Peak District hills to take photographs of a plane wreckage. After mountain rescue teams were called out to help them twice in one day.

“Instagram hikers” have been warned against traveling into the Peak District hills to take photographs of a plane wreckage. After mountain rescue teams were called out to help them twice in one day.

Warning not to take pilgrimage to plane wreck: The wreckage of the plane lies at Higher Shelf Stones between Sheffield and Manchester. The US military plane came down in 1948 with all 13 people on board being killed. And fog was the cause of the crash researchers said. Following a series of recent issues regarding rescuing people and with the onset of winter. The Glossop mountain rescue team are urging people to be prepared if they are going to venture across the Peak District.

The volunteer group have posted on Facebook to say. “The Peak District has become a big draw for visitors from Greater Manchester, Yorkshire and beyond during the recent lockdown. Higher Shelf Stones in particular has found unlikely fame on TikTok and Instagram. Thanks to its eerie and photogenic landscape. Where the natural beauty of the area contrasts with the wreckage of a crashed B29 Superfortress. Leading to two incidents in a three-hour period over the weekend, on top of one the day before near to Crowden.”

Team Leader Patch Hayley went on to say. “Visitors should be aware that social media only tells them half the story. Always check the weather before you set off.

Conditions can change without warning at these elevations. And low cloud can reduce visibility drastically. It’s easy to get disorientated and wet. And that’s when hypothermia can set in. And remember to allow plenty of time to get back before sunset.  As conditions underfoot will become claggy, and navigation nearly impossible.

Make sure you bring food, water, a torch, and a map and compass. And be confident you can use them.” They have also urged people who call for help to let them know if they reach safety. Before the team is deployed after being called out on false alarms. Hayley said “This has happened twice in recent weeks. We’re always glad to hear that people are safe. But I can’t stress enough how important it is to keep us informed.

If people do make their own way down after they call emergency services for assistance. It’s vital they let us know via 101. My fear is that with higher volumes of walkers visiting the area during lockdown, more of these false alarms will leave our rescue team overstretched. And at risk of struggling to reach those who are genuinely in need of urgent assistance.”


https://Global247News.com  Global247News Twitter

Global247News Facebook  Global247News WebWiki Review


Share on your Social Networks

Advertisement

Leave a Reply